Pastry, Cakes and Sweet Meats

PLUM PUDDING
By: Folly Life

One pound of raisins, stoned and cut in half.

One pound of currants, picked, washed and dried.

One pound of beef suet chopped fine.

One pound of grated stale bread, or, half a pound of flour and half a pound of bread.

Eight eggs.

A quarter of a pound of sugar.

A glass of brandy.

A pint of milk.

A glass of wine.

Two nutmegs, grated.

A table-spoonful of mixed cinnamon and mace.

A salt-spoonful of salt.

You must prepare all your ingredients the day before (except

beating the eggs) that in the morning you may have nothing to do

but to mix them, as the pudding will require six hours to boil.

Beat the eggs very light, then put to them half the milk and beat

both together. Stir in gradually the flour and grated bread. Next

add the sugar by degrees. Then the suet and fruit alternately. The

fruit must be well sprinkled with flour, lest it sink to the

bottom. Stir very hard. Then add the spice and liquor, and lastly

the remainder of the milk. Stir the whole mixture very well

together. If it is not thick enough, add a little more grated

bread or flour. If there is too much bread or flour, the pudding

will be hard and heavy.

Dip your pudding-cloth, in boiling water, shake it out and

sprinkle it slightly with flour. Lay it in a pan and pour the

mixture into the cloth. Tie it up carefully, allowing room for the

pudding to swell.

Boil it six hours, and turn it carefully out of the cloth.

Before you send it to table, have ready some blanched sweet

almonds cut in slips, or some slips of citron, or both. Stick them

all over the outside of the pudding.

Eat it with wine, or with a sauce made of drawn butter, wine and

nutmeg.

The pudding will be improved if you add to the other ingredients,

the grated rind of a large lemon or orange.
Source:FollyLife.com

LEMON PUDDING
By: Folly Life

One small lemon, with a smooth thin rind.

Three eggs.

A quarter of a pound of powdered white sugar.

A quarter of a pound of fresh butter–washed.

A table-spoonful of white wine and brandy, mixed.

A tea-spoonful of rose-water.

Five ounces of sifted flour, and a quarter of a pound of

fresh butter for the paste.

Grate the yellow part of the rind of a small lemon. Then cut the

lemon in half, and squeeze the juice into the plate that contains

the grated rind, carefully taking out all the seeds. Mix the juice

and rind together.

Put a quarter of a pound of powdered white sugar into a deep

earthen pan, and cut up in it a quarter of a pound of the best

fresh butter. If the weather is very cold, set the pan near the

fire, for a few minutes, to soften the butter, but do not allow it

to melt or it will be heavy. Stir the butter and sugar together,

with a stick or wooden spoon, till it is perfectly light and of

the consistence of cream.

Put the eggs in a shallow broad pan, and beat them with an

egg-beater or rods, till they are quite smooth, and as thick as a

boiled custard. Then stir the eggs, gradually, into the pan of

butter and sugar. Add the liquor and rose water by degrees, and

then stir in, gradually, the juice and grated rind of the lemon.

Stir the whole very hard, after all the ingredients are in.

Have ready a puff-paste made of five ounces of sifted flour, and a

quarter of a pound of fresh butter. The paste must be made with as

little water as possible. Roll it out in a circular sheet, thin in

the centre, and thicker towards the edges, and just large enough

to cover the bottom, sides, and edges of a soup-plate. Butter the

soup-plate very well, and lay the paste in it, making it neat and

even round the broad edge of the plate. With a sharp knife, trim

off the superfluous dough, and notch the edges. Put in the mixture

with a spoon, and bake the pudding about half an hour, in a

moderate oven. It should be baked of a very light brown. If the

oven is too hot, the paste will not have time to rise well. If too

cold, it will be clammy. When the pudding is cool, grate

loaf-sugar over it.

Before using lemons for any purpose, always roll them awhile with

your hand on a table. This will cause them to yield a larger

quantity of juice.
Source:FollyLife.com

ORANGE PUDDING.
By: Folly Life

One large orange, of a deep colour, and smooth thin rind.

One lime.

A quarter of a pound of powdered white sugar.

A quarter of a pound of fresh butter.

Three eggs.

A table-spoonful of mixed wine and brandy.

A tea-spoonful of rose-water.

Grate the yellow rind of the orange and lime, and squeeze the

juice into a saucer or soup-plate, taking out all the seeds.

Stir the butter and sugar to a cream.

Beat the eggs as light as possible, and then stir them by degrees

into the pan of butter and sugar. Add, gradually, the liquor and

rose-water, and then by degrees, the orange and lime. Stir all

well together.

Have ready a sheet of puff-paste made of five ounces of sifted

flour, and a quarter of a pound of fresh butter. Lay the paste in

a buttered soup-plate. Trim and notch the edges, and then put in

the mixture. Bake it about half an hour, in a moderate oven. Grate

loaf-sugar over it, before you send it to table.
Source:FollyLife.com

COCOA-NUT PUDDING
By: Folly Life

A quarter of a pound of cocoa-nut, grated.

A quarter of a pound of powdered white sugar.

Three ounces and a half of fresh butter.

The whites only of six eggs.

A table-spoonful of wine and brandy mixed.

Half a tea-spoonful of rose-water.

Break up a cocoa-nut, and take the thin brown skin carefully off,

with a knife. Wash all the pieces in cold water, and then wipe

them dry, with a clean towel. Weigh a quarter of a pound of

cocoa-nut, and grate it very fine, into a soup-plate.

Stir the butter and sugar to a cream, and add the liquor and

rose-water gradually to them.

Beat the whites only, of six eggs, till they stand alone on the

rods; and then stir the beaten white of egg, gradually, into the

butter and sugar. Afterwards, sprinkle in, by degrees, the grated

cocoa-nut, stirring hard all the time. Then stir all very well at

the last.

Have ready a puff-paste, sufficient to cover the bottom, sides,

and edges of a soup-plate. Put in the mixture, and bake it in a

moderate oven, about half an hour.

Grate loaf-sugar over it, when cool.
Source:FollyLife.com

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